Answered By: Marie Rose
Last Updated: Nov 17, 2015     Views: 63

The Navy Cross is second only to the Medal of Honor for navy/marine personnel. It was authorized by Congress on February 4, 1919. Before this, navy personnel were awarded the Distinguished Service Cross. Several Citadel graduates and alumni have been awarded the Navy Cross.

First Lt. George Hampton Yarborough, Jr. Class of 1916. U.S. Marine Corps. (posthumously) for extraordinary heroism while serving with the 5th Regiment (Marines), 2d Division, A.E.F. in action in the Bois-de-Belleau, France, 23 June 1918. First Lieutenant Yarborough displayed exceptional bravery when his platoon was in a support position under intense artillery fire, by moving from one shell hole to another in the open and steadying his men. After making one trip over his line he was wounded by an exploding shell, but refused aid until he saw that the wounded soldiers with him had been treated and taken to shelter. He later died of his wounds. Action Date: 23-Jun-18 Service: Marine Corps Rank: First Lieutenant Regiment: 5th Regiment (Marines) Division: 2d Division, American Expeditionary Forces His portrait hangs in the Daniel Library.

First Lt. Julius C. Cogswell. Class of 1917. for extraordinary heroism while serving with the Eightieth Company, Sixth Regiment (Marines), 2d Division, A.E.F., in action in the bombardment of La Cense Farm, France, 6 June 1918. Having been previously wounded, First Lieutenant Cogswell refused to be evacuated, and handled his platoon with marked bravery and skill in an assault on a formidable machine-gun position until seriously wounded on 6 June 1918. General Orders: War Department, General Orders No. 126 (1918) Action Date: 6-Jun-18 Service: Marine Corps Rank: First Lieutenant Company: 80th Company Regiment: 6th Regiment (Marines) Division: 2d Division, American Expeditionary Forces

Died August 24, 1947, Major, USMC. Severely wounded June 8, 1918. Awarded Distinguished Service Cross, Navy Cross. His portrait hangs in the Daniel Library. (Sources: Oliver Bond. Story of The Citadel, p. 191. Charleston News and Courier,August 25, 1947)

Edward Buist Hope, Class of 1917, USMC, for extraordinary heroism while serving with the 5th Regiment (Marines), 2d Division, A.E.F. in action at Chateau-Thierry, France, 6 June 1918. First Lieutenant Hope displayed coolness and courage in directing his platoon in the attack, during which he was badly wounded, but refused assistance until wounded men near him had been treated.

Action Date: 6-Jun-18

Service: Marine Corps

Rank: First Lieutenant

Regiment: 5th Regiment (Marines)

Division: 2d Division, American Expeditionary Forces

Gen. E. A. Pollock Class of 1921. USMC, for extraordinary heroism and distinguished service as Commanding Officer of the Second Battalion, First Marines, FIRST Marine Division, in action against enemy Japanese forces Guadalcanal, during the night of 20 - 21 August 1942. When the troops under his command were subjected to a powerful and determined surprise attack at the Tenaru River, Lieutenant Colonel Pollock, immediately leaving his Command Post, advanced through severe enemy mortar and machine-gun fire to a position in the front line, and while thus constantly exposed to extreme danger, directed the defense of our forces for a period of twelve hours. As a result of his excellent judgment and superb leadership, the men under his command destroyed practically the entire enemy force of seven hundred. His outstanding courage and dauntless spirit of aggressiveness contributed greatly to the success of our forces and were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. General Orders: SPOT AWARD (October 1942) Action Date: August 20 - 21, 1942 Service: Marine Corps Rank: Lieutenant Colonel Company: Commanding Officer Battalion: 2d Battalion Regiment: 1st Marines Division: 1st Marine Division

Chairman of the Board of Visitors, 1965-1968. His portrait hangs in the Daniel Library.

Bernard Lige Austin, 'x-Class of 1922, USNA '1924, USN, for extraordinary heroism and distinguished service in the line of his profession as Commander, Destroyer Division FORTY-SIX (DesDiv 46), in action against enemy Japanese forces in the Solomon Islands on the night of 1 - 2 November 1943. With his Task Force engaging a Japanese surface force of superior fire power, Captain Austin hurled the full fighting strength of his ships against the enemy and, by his inspiring leadership and skilled combat tactics, aided his Task Force in sinking five hostile warships, in damaging four others and in completely routing the enemy, thereby contributing materially to the successful establishment of our beachhead on Bougainville Island. His determination, relentless fighting spirit and gallant devotion to duty upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. General Orders: Commander Southern Pacific Forces: Serial 00162 (January 14, 1944) Action Date: November 1 - 2, 1943 Service: Navy Rank: Captain Company: Commanding Officer Division: Destroyer Division 46

Second Award for extraordinary heroism and distinguished service in the line of his profession as Commander, Destroyer Division FORTY-SIX, attached to Destroyer Squadron TWENTY-THREE, during a night engagement with six enemy Japanese warships off Bougainville, British Solomon Islands, on 24 - 25 November 1942. Seeking out and fearlessly engaging a powerful enemy, Commodore Austin fought his Division with resolute courage and daring aggressiveness, frequently risking his own personal safety to press home vigorous, unrelenting attacks upon Japanese surface forces. By his extreme valor and inspiring leadership, he evoked the indomitable fighting spirit which enabled the gallant officers and men under his command to contribute materially to the crushing defeat imposed upon the enemy in the sinking of four ships and the serious damaging of two others. An expert seaman and tactician, Commodore Austin retired his forces from the engagement without loss or damage and his high devotion to duty and splendid conduct throughout the action were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. General Orders: Commander Southern Pacific: Serial 00193 (January 17, 1944) Action Date: November 24 - 25, 1943 Service: Navy Rank: Commodore Company: Commanding Officer Division: Destroyer Division 46

James M. Masters, x-Class of 1932, USNA '1933, for extraordinary heroism as Executive Officer of the Seventh Marines, FIRST Marine Division, in action against enemy Japanese forces during the assault on Dakeshi Ridge, Okinawa, Ryukyu Islands, from 10 to 12 May 1945. On 10 May, when the advance of the Regiment was checked by a strong hostile force, Lieutenant Colonel Masters unhesitatingly went forward of the front lines on reconnaissance and obtained information concerning the Japanese and unfamiliar terrain which enabled a successful attack to be made the following day. On 11 May, he established an advanced observation post in the only possible position on the front lines from which the attack that day could be observed and directed and, despite unusually heavy casualties at the post from intense enemy mortar and small-arms fire, continued to man it and report information vital to the capture of desperately defended Dakeshi Ridge, Moving the observation post forward again on 12 May, he advanced under intense hostile fire to the Ridge before that ground had been completely seized by assault troops and, although the Japanese continued to inflict heavy casualties on his force, persevered in his mission to observe the enemy and terrain, thus securing information which aided materially in the formulation of successful plans for continuing the attack. His inspiring leadership, courage and unremitting devotion to duty throughout were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. General Orders: SPOT AWARD, Fleet Marine Force Pacific: Serial 77925 Action Date: May 10 - 12, 1945 Service: Marine Corps Rank: Lieutenant Colonel Regiment: 7th Marines Division: 1st Marine Division

John Devereux Blitch, x-Class of 1935, USNA '1936, for extraordinary heroism in operations against the enemy while serving as Pilot of a carrier-based Navy Dive Bomber in Bombing Squadron FOURTEEN (VB-14), attached to the U.S.S. WASP (CV-18), in action against the enemy fleet in the vicinity of the East Philippine Sea on 20 June 1944. While acting as strike leader of a force of carrier-based aircraft, Lieutenant Commander Blitch led his strike to the absolute maximum range of his dive bombing aircraft in search of units of the Japanese fleet. After sighting a group of enemy tankers but no major combatant units of the enemy force, he then led his flight on a search for enemy carriers fifty miles to the south, well-knowing that the fuel remaining in his dive bombing planes including his own plane would probably not permit a safe return to friendly forces. After failing to find enemy forces to the south, he led his aircraft back to the force of enemy tankers and destroyers and in the face of heavy anti-aircraft fire, of all types, and enemy fighter opposition, conducted an effective and damaging attack on them with the planes under his control, which resulted in the sinking of two tankers of supply ships, one destroyer, the damaging of two tankers and one destroyer, and the destruction of five enemy aircraft. By his brilliant airmanship, aggressive fighting spirit and unwavering devotion to duty, Lieutenant Commander Blitch contributed materially to the success of our operations in this historic engagement, and his great personal valor in the face of grave peril was in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. General Orders: Commander 1st Carrier Task Force Pacific: Serial 0543 (September 16, 1944) Action Date: 20-Jun-44 Service: Navy Rank: Lieutenant Commander Company: Bombing Squadron 14 (VB-14) Division: U.S.S. Wasp (CV-18)

Col. Myron C. Harrington. U.S.M.C. (Ret.) Class of 1960. for extraordinary heroism while serving as Commanding Officer for Company D, First Battalion, Fifth Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), Fleet Marine Force, in connection with operations against the enemy in the Republic of Vietnam. On the afternoon of 23 February 1968, Company D was attacking a well entrenched North Vietnamese Army force that was occupying a fortified section of the wall surrounding the Hue Citadel. As the Marines maneuvered forward, they began receiving a heavy volume of small arms, automatic weapons, mortar and antitank rocket fire. Realizing the seriousness of the situation, Captain Harrington skillfully deployed his 3.5 rocket teams into advantageous firing positions. Continuously moving from one position to another, he pinpointed enemy emplacements and skillfully directed the fire of his men. After silencing four hostile positions, he requested supporting arms fire and skillfully adjusted 60-mm. mortar fire to within twenty-five meters of the forward elements of his company, while simultaneously adjusting artillery fire. Disregarding his own safety, Captain Harrington then fearlessly maneuvered to the point of heaviest contact and, rallying his men, boldly led a determined assault against the enemy soldiers. Shouting words of encouragement to his men, he skillfully maneuvered his unit forward and directed the Marines' fire upon the hostile emplacements. Largely due to his resolute determination and intrepid fighting spirit, his men overran the hostile positions and routed the North Vietnamese soldiers, accounting for twenty-five enemy soldiers confirmed killed. By his courage, superb leadership and unfaltering devotion to duty in the face of extreme personal danger, Captain Harrington upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service. General Orders: Authority: Navy Department Board of Decorations and Medals Action Date: 23-Feb-68 Service: Marine Corps Rank: Captain Company: Company D Battalion: 1st Battalion Regiment: 5th Marines Division: 1st Marine Division (Rein.) FMF

Professor of Naval Science, 1987-1989. (Source: William Hesse, USN)

Lt. John L. Fuller. Class of 1966. USMCR. (posthumously) for extraordinary heroism in action against insurgent communist (Viet Cong) forces while serving as Platoon Leader, Third Platoon, Company E, Second Battalion, Fifth Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), Fleet Marine Force, on 23 March 1967. During Operation NEW CASTLE, Second Lieutenant Fuller's platoon was maneuvering toward the fortified village of Dai Khuong 1, Quang Nam Province, when they were undertaken by intense small arms, mortar and recoilless rifle fire from a well-entrenched enemy force. Moving with the lead squad, Second Lieutenant Fuller was wounded by the initial burst of fire. Unmindful of his wound, he stationed himself to direct fire on the advancing enemy and while positioning and encouraging his men, he was struck again by enemy fire. Although suffering from a severe loss of blood he courageously began maneuvering toward the radio position of the platoon, with the intention of directing artillery fire on the enemy, knowing it would save the lives of the other Marines. In his advance toward the radio, he received his fatal wound; however, his profound sense of duty and determination enabled him to reach the radio, but he lost consciousness and subsequently died of his wounds while attempting to call in the artillery fire. Inspired by his apparent calm, valiant fighting spirit and dynamic leadership, his Marines went on to defeat the Viet Cong in this fierce battle. Second Lieutenant Fuller's daring initiative and his undying devotion to duty reflected great credit upon himself and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. General Orders: Authority: Navy Department Board of Decorations and Medals Action Date: 23-Mar-67 Service: Marine Corps Reserve Rank: Second Lieutenant Company: Company E Battalion: 2d Battalion Regiment: 5th Marines Division: 1st Marine Division (Rein.) FMF His portrait hangs in the Daniel Library.

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